Reports

Introduction to reporting

The reporting module allows users with the appropriate credentials to build or view reports about data in the system. These reports can cover things like vulnerability trends, ticket loads, and top risk areas.

Reporting within Brinqa is extremely flexible and powerful due to the graph data model and our use of API calls to retrieve data. It allows the system to dynamically create subsets of data based on any attributes in a data model, provide in-report filtering, and display data on reports more quickly.

Clicking the Reports icon in the left navigation bar will take you to the Reports page, which displays a list view of all existing reports.

Table 1: List view contents

       
ColumnsDescription
Title Title of the report
Description Description of the report
Created by User who created the report
Last Updated Last time this report layout was updated

Creating a new report

  1. Navigate to the Reports module using the left navigation bar.
  2. Click Create Report
  3. Fill in the following and click Create:

Table 2: New report properties

           
FieldsDescription
Title Title of the report. The title will be displayed wherever the report appears in the UI.
Name Reference name for queries and scripts. The name can contain only letters, numbers, and underscores.
Description Description of the report. Description is displayed on the reports list view and can be searched from the reports list view search bar.
Accessible From Specifies whether this report will be available to all Brinqa applications or only the application you are currently administrating.

Adding inputs

Once you have created your report, you can start adding elements. One of these elements is Inputs, which allow viewers of the report to dynamically filter its contents. For example, you could create a ticket report that initially displays information about all existing tickets then, by changing a user input, display the same visualizations with ticket data for one particular staff member.

  1. Click the + Add Inputs button at the top right of the screen. This will take you to the Edit Report modal
  2. Select a Data Model from the drop down at the bottom of the modal. The inputs available on a report will be limited to attributes or related attributes of this data model.
  3. Click the Inputs tab on the left.
  4. Click Add Input
  5. Add the following information and click Update:

Table 3. New input properties

           
FieldsDescription
Type Type of field this input will use.
Single select is a drop down menu allowing selection of a single value for the chosen attribute.

Multiple select is a drop down menu allowing selection of multiple values for the chosen attribute.

Time is a date-picker field that allows selection of a date or date range.
Attribute Attribute this input will filter data by. The attributes are populated from the data model selected.
Label Label the input field will have on the report. E.g. Business Unit
+/- Buttons to add or remove an input. Multiple input options from the same data model can be selected.

Once they’ve been created, input fields can be edited or removed using the pencil and X buttons above the fields on the report.

Creating report layout

Creating the body of a report consists of first creating layout elements like columns and rows, then adding Sections containing data visualizations to those columns and rows.

Below, all buttons on the report builder UI are described. The buttons that pertain specifically to structuring the layout mention rows or columns.

Table 4: Report builder UI

           
ButtonsDescription
   
Adds a row to the report
   
Adds an input to filter data in report
   
Edit report/View source: if located at the top right of the page
Edit column: if located at the top right of a column
Edit section: if located at the top right of a section within a column
   
Add column to associated row in report
   
Remove associated row from the report
   
Add a single visualization section to associated column. Visualization options listed below.
   
Remove associated column from the report

Available sections/visualizations

Sections on a report contain individual data visualizations, which are described below. To see more in-depth information about visualizations, navigate to the Visualizations article in the documentation.  

Table 5: Report visualizations

           
VisualizationDescription
Table Displays a table of values. Tables are useful for displaying any information that’s best in a list. For example, lists of top priority vulnerabilities or tickets and lists of network segments by business unit.
Single Value Displays a single value. Single values are useful for displaying things like the total number of open tickets, the highest risk IP, or any other single data point.
Line Displays a line trend chart. Line trend charts are useful for seeing comparisons of data over time, like the number of new vulnerabilities week to week.
Area Displays a line trend chart with area between the line and 0 filled in. Area charts can be used any time a line chart would be, but are preferable when tracking multiple lines, since the shading helps differentiate the elements being tracked.
Column Displays vertical columns of data. Columns are useful when visualizing relative counts of data.
Bar Displays horizontal bars of data. Bar and column visualizations can be used interchangeably, but bars may work better when the bar/column labels are long.
Pie Displays a pie chart. Pie charts are useful for displaying proportional information like percentages.
Donut Displays a donut chart. Donut and pie charts can be used interchangeably.
Heatmap Displays data in the form of a heatmap. Heatmaps are useful for displaying information about things like the concentration of certain events in certain times or locations. For example, concentration of vulnerabilities by host by month. Colors are used to indicate the level of concentration and whether that amount is problematic.
Treemap Displays data in the form of a treemap, showing hierarchical data as nested rectangles. Treemaps are useful for displaying proportional information like percentages according to more than one attribute.

Creating a visualization

  1. Click the Section button associated with the column where you want the visualization
  2. Select a visualization type and fill in the following:

Table 6: New visualization properties

           
FieldsDescription
Title Title of section. This will appear above the section on the report.
Data Model Data model the visualization will pull information from. If you selected a data model on the Edit report modal in order to add inputs, only that data model can be selected for visualizations.
Measures Calculations performed on objects within the system. Measures will be discussed in greater detail below.
Dimensions How the data from a measure will be grouped. Dimensions will be discussed in greater detail below.
Limit Limits the amount of data pulled from selected data model. Usually this means limiting the number of rows or columns of information displayed.
Sort by Sorts visualization by a selected attribute, ascending or descending.

Measures

Measures and dimensions are how you choose exactly what information is displayed in your visualization.

Measures are calculations performed on objects within the system. In Brinqa applications, you select an aggregate function and the objects of that function are determined by the data model you select. So, for example, if you select the Ticket data model and Count function, the calculation you receive is the total number of tickets.

Table 7. Measure functions

          
FunctionDescription
Average Average value of the selected attribute. The average function can only be applied to attributes that are numeric values.
Count Number of instances of the selected data model in the system.
Count Unique Number of unique instances of the selected data model in the system.
Max Current maximum value of the selected attribute. The max function can only be applied to attributes that are numeric values.
Min Current minimum value of the selected attribute. The min function can only be applied to attributes that are numeric values.
Sum Sum of values of the selected attribute. The sum function can only be applied to attributes that are numeric values.
Unique Number of unique values of the selected attribute in the system.

Dimensions

Dimensions are how data from the selected measure will be grouped. For example, in a visualization of total tickets per month, “total tickets” is the measure and “per month” is the dimension. The count of total tickets is divided into groups according to the month in which they were created.

All attributes of a data model will be selectable as dimensions, but some will make more sense than others as sorting options. In general, the only ones that will never make good candidates for dimensions are completely unique attributes like ID.

Multiple dimensions can be selected for the same visualization. This allows you to display things like total vulnerabilities per business unit per quarter.

Transformation

Dimensions that use timestamp attributes will have a transformation option when you select them, which allows you to determine the granularity of the dimension. For timestamps this means whether you’d like to look at the year, quarter, month, week or day of the timestamp.

Buckets

Dimensions that use numeric attributes (including timestamps, which are stored as integers) will have a bucket option. Buckets allow you to set ranges for dimensions. For example, vulnerability risk scores run from 0 to 10 but could be put into buckets of low (0-2), medium (3-6), and high (7-10) if that was a more desirable way of viewing the information.  

Configuring appearance

Once a visualization has been created users can modify its appearance, including the colors, grid lines, max values, and how the data stacks.

Most visualizations have the same appearance options, but tables and single value visualizations have slightly different modals. The tables below will cover each version of appearance modification.

  1. Click the edit button associated with the visualization
  2. Select Display and fill in the following:

Table 8. Display properties for line, area, column, bar, pie, donut, heatmap, and treemap charts

           
Tab FieldDescription
General Stacking Whether different data from the same attribute appears separately or stacked on column and bar graphs. A stacked bar or column graph might show the total vulnerabilities on a host divided proportionately by severity. For a picture of a stacked bar graph, navigate to the Visualizations page.

  • “None” will show different data stacked next to each other if multiple dimensions are chosen.
  • “Stacked” will show data stacked into one column.
  • “Percentage” will show data stacked into one column, but the column length will represent 100%, with the divisions according to percent.
Empty Values What the visualization should do if there are empty values for some sections of data (e.g. on a line chart with weeks along the x-axis, what to do with weeks where there was no data).

  • “None” will show a gap in the chart where the missing data is
  • “Connect” will connect the data data points on either side of the missing data
  • “Zeroes” will replace the missing data with zeroes.
  • Options These are general options for the visualization's display.

  • “Zooming” will allow viewers of the report to zoom in closer on certain graphs.
  • “Drilldown” will allow readers of the report to click on sections of visualizations and be taken to list views of the objects they represent. E.g. all critical severity bugs in production.
  • “Show values” will show the exact values associated with counts of items on the visualization.
  • “Show summary” will show a table of the exact values associated with items on the visualization below the chart.
  • “Show grid lines” will show grid lines on graphs.
  • “Smooth line" will make line and area chart lines less angular.
  • Axes Title (vertical and horizontal axes) The title of that axis
    Value (vertical and horizontal axes) Which measure or dimension should appear on that axis
    Type (vertical and horizontal axes) How data should be plotted.
  • Linear: displays data linearly
  • Logarithmic: shows a straight line when data is on a logarithmic/exponential scale
  • Category: the point names of the chart's series are used for categories.
  • Labels format (vertical and horizontal axes) Characters can be added before and after label values using the variable {value}.
    E.g. {value}% would convert a labels like 10, 20, 30, 40 to 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%
    Size Determines the minimum and maximum values along the vertical axis, and what interval grid lines should occur at.
    Reversed direction (vertical and horizontal axes) Reverses the sort of values along the axis
    Plot line A line stretching across the plot area, marking a specific value. The value where the line should occur, and color, type, and width of the line can be selected.
    Group by Dimension or measure to group data by.
    Label angle Angle of labels on the horizontal axis. Changing the angle sometimes allows larger labels to be displayed.
    Appearance Theme Allows selection of a color theme for the chart, the default white theme or a "Darcula" a dary gray theme.
    Background Sets the background color of the chart using color names or hex codes.
    Text Color Sets the text color of the chart using color names or hex codes.
    Line Color Sets the line color of the chart using color names or hex codes.
    Border Enables a border around the visualization.
    Border color Sets the color of the border using color names or hex codes.
    Default colors The colors field allows you to specify colors by name or hex code to be used as the default color. The system will randomly assign the colors to each group with a color.
    Color by data point Sets color of data points by their shared horizontal axis value. E.g. all data points in one column will be the same color.
    Conditional colors Conditional fields allow you to specify which values should be which colors using color names or hex codes.
    Tooltip enabled Shows a tooltip with values when mousing over parts of the chart
    Share between series If multiple values exist at a certain horizontal axis value (e.g. if there are multiple lines on a line chart) all values at that horizontal point will display in one tooltip
    Legend enabled Enables the chart legend
    Item layout Determines whether legend items are stacked horizontally or vertically
    Alignment Determines whether legend items appear at the center, left, or right of the chart.
    Vertical alignment Determines whether legend items appear at the top, side, or bottom of the chart.

    Single value and angular gauge appearance

    Table 9. Appearance properties for single value and angular gauge visualizations

    Tab Field Description
    General Value If there are measures and dimensions, this field determines which of those values is displayed as the single value. E.g. If you wanted to display information about the most vulnerable IP, it would allow you to choose whether to display the number of vulnerabilities it has or its IP address.
    Rendering Determines whether the value is displayed as a number, star rating, icon, or other options.
    Alignment Determines the alignment of the value within the visualization.
    Range (angular gauge only) Specifies the range values fall in. E.g. a risk score gauge would have the range of 0 to 10
    Before/After/Above/Under Label Allows users to enter text that will appear before, after, above, or under the value in the visualization, and choose the text's font size.
    Drilldown Allows readers of the report to click on single values and be taken to list views of the object(s) they represent. E.g. all critical severity bugs in production.
    Appearance Border Enables a border around the visualization.
    Border color Sets the color of the border using color names or hex codes.
    Section color Determines the background and text colors of the visualization
    Conditional colors Allows user to specify that certain values in the visualization should cause the background and text colors to change, e.g. become red when a value is critical
    Font Size Maximum and minimum font sizes for displaying the single value text. This field is useful if the size of the contents of the single value field could vary significantly.
    Under Label Text that will appear below the single value. This field is the title of the visualization and will update the title.
    Colors Default Default coloring will always display the single value according to the color scheme set in the Default Background and Default Text fields.
    Conditional Allows you to specify conditions on the value that will change its display colors. E.g. if the average risk score is above 8, display the average risk score in red.
    Formatting Group Delimiter The punctuation mark used to delimit thousands groups.
    Decimal Mark The punctuation mark used to indicate decimal places.
    Decimal Places Allows you to specify how many decimal places to display.

    Table appearance

    Tables have one central appearance setting, which is how values in columns render. There are a number of ways to render values including as links, icons, star ratings, and sparklines. You can also set simpler rendering options, like how many decimal places appear for numeric values.

    Table 10. Table column rendering options


    Option Description
    Lozenge Displays the value in a lozenge-shaped container.

    • Value: Enter a single value or range of values. If the value in that field meets those conditions, it will be displayed as whatever you have in the Display As field. E.g. If the risk rating is between 7 and 9, display a lozenge that says “Critical” instead of the risk rating.
    • Display As: What the value should display as if it meets the value or range conditions set in the Value field.
    • Style: Toggle between pre-configured lozenge styles or defining your own lozenge styles. If you choose to define your own, you’ll be presented with fields for text, background, and border color.
    Link Displays the value as a link. This is useful for tables that display lists of specific tickets or vulnerabilities. The link will take the user to the show view of the linked item.
    Icon Converts specific values to a Font Awesome icon.
    Code Displays code properly formatted in a block.
    Number Displays the value as a number and allows you to specify the group delimiter, decimal mark, and number of decimal places.
    Star Rating Displays the value as a star rating out of five stars.
    Text Displays the value as text.
    Multiple Attributes Combines multiple attributes into one value for the field. Attribute reference names must be contained within double curly brackets and with any connecting text or symbols placed around them. E.g. {{ip_address}}:{{os}} could return 10.17.204.56:Windows 7 and {{ip_address}} with {{os}} could return 10.17.204.56 with Windows 7.
    Date Displays a timestamp value as a date.
    Date Time Displays a timestamp value as a date and time.
    Sparkline Displays a small trend chart of historical values of that field rather than a single current value. The attribute must have “Track History” set on it at the data model level in order for this chart to work.

    Using filters

    The Filter option allows you to fine-tune the data that appears in a visualization, showing only relavant subsets.

    1. Click the edit button associated with the view
    2. Select Filters.
    3. Add filters using the filter clause interface:

    Table 11. Filter clause interface

               
    ElementDescription
    Add AND Clause Specifies conditions that must be met. (E.g. owner is Dave)
    Add OR Clause Specifies an alternate set of conditions that could be met. (E.g. owner is Dave OR owner is Marg)
    Reset Filters Clears all the filter options.
    Attribute Attribute referenced for the condition. (E.g. owner)
    Operator Operator for the specified value. (E.g. greater than, equal to, is not, contains)
    Value Value the operator compares the data to. (E.g. a specific name or host)
    AND Adds an additional AND condition to the associated section.
    OR Adds an OR between two different conditions within a clause (e.g. owner is Marg and status is New OR Active). These ORs must share the same attribute. E.g. Status is Active OR New, but not Status is Active OR Priority is Critical.

    Making more attributes filterable

    If you don’t see an attribute as a filtering option, it isn’t set to allow filters in the data model. This can be changed by modifying the attribute’s metadata.

    1. Navigate to the application the attribute’s data model is associated with
    2. Navigate to Administration > Data Management > Data Models
    3. Select the data model associated with the attribute
    4. Find the desired attribute on the data model and click the Actions button
    5. Select Edit
    6. At the bottom of the modal window, check “Supports Filter”
    7. Click Update to update the attribute
    8. Click Update to update the data model

    Copying to other reports/views

    Visualizations on a report can be copied to other reports or views using the Copy To function. The function will copy not just the visualization, but also any filters or appearance changes associated with it. This is useful if you have multiple reports that will require the same visualization, or want a particular visualization to appear both on a report and a dashboard.

    When using the Copy To function, remember that the system considers reports a type of view.

    1. Click the Edit button associated with the section you want to copy
    2. Select Copy to
    3. Select the view/report you want to copy the visualization to
    4. Click Update

    After copying a visualization to another report or view, you may want to navigate to that report/view to see where the visualization was placed. If the placement is not desirable, you can drag the visualization to a different part of the report or view. Click Done when finished with your changes.

    Sharing reports

    Reports can be shared with other users of the Brinqa application. The share functionality allows you to specify permissions, include a message, and send a link via email.

    1. Navigate to the report you want to share
    2. Click Share and fill in the following:
    3. Table 12. Share report dialog            
      FieldsDescription
      Share with Select from the list of Brinqa users who you would like to share the report with.
      Permissions Select whether users will be able to view, comment on, or edit the report.
      Message Enter a message that will be sent to the selected users along with link to report.
      Get Link Provides a direct sharing link to the selected report.
    4. Click Share

    TUTORIAL: Vulnerability Overview Report

    This tutorial will cover how to create a Vulnerability Overview report. The report will contain the following visualizations and pieces of data:

    1) Create the report.

    1. Navigate to the Reports module using the left navigation bar.
    2. Click Create Report
    3. Fill in the the following properties:

    Table 1: New report properties

    Fields Description Tutorial Example
    Title Title of the report. The title will be displayed wherever the report appears in the UI. Vulnerability Overview Report
    Name Reference name for queries and scripts. The name can contain only letters, numbers, and underscores. vulnerabilities_overview
    Description Description of the report. Description is displayed on the reports list view and can be searched from the reports list view search bar. Overview of vulnerabilities by score, data center, and age.
    Accessible From Specifies whether this report will be available to all Brinqa applications or only the application you are currently administrating. Owning application only

    2) Select the data model and inputs for the report.

    Inputs allow viewers of a report to filter the data they see. This report is a vulnerability overview so when a user first views it, it will show the overall status of vulnerabilities at your company as a whole. Adding inputs like “Business Unit” or “Host Owner” will allow the viewers to filter out a subset of data, so they can e.g. get an idea of the health of individual parts of the company.

    For this tutorial, we will be adding the following inputs:

    • Business Unit: to see an overview of risk by business unit.
    • Host Owner: to see the distribution and severity of issues by host owner.

    1. Click the Edit (...) button at the top right of the screen
    2. Select Edit Report from the drop-down menu
    3. Select “Vulnerability” as the Data Model from the drop down at the bottom of the modal. This selection will make the Inputs tab appear on the modal and determine the inputs available to you on that tab.
    4. Click the Inputs tab on the left.
    5. Click Add Input
    6. Click the + button to the right of that row. This will create settings for an additional input.
    7. Add the following information for each input and click Update:

    Table 2. Report input settings


    Input Settings
    Business Unit Type: Single Select
    Attribute: Business Unit. Business unit is a related attribute, so scroll to the bottom of the attributes list and select “Show related attributes…”. This will allow you to select attributes from related data models. Click Host → Host Attributes, Business Service → Business Service Attributes, then Business Unit.
    Label: Business Unit
    Owner Type: Single Select
    Attribute: Owner. Owner is a related attribute, so scroll to the bottom of the attributes list and select “Show related attributes…”. This will allow you to select attributes from related data models. Click Host → Host Attributes, then Owner.
    Label: Host Owner

    3) Add a “total active vulnerabilities” section.

    1. Click the Add Section button and select Single Value from the menu
    2. Enter “Active Vulnerabilities” for the Title
    3. Select “Vulnerability” for the Data Model
    4. Select “Count” for the Measures. This tells the section to display the total number (count) of vulnerabilities in the system.
    5. Click Add
    6. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    7. Select Filters
    8. Select “Status” for the first attribute, “Not Equals To” for the operator, and “Fixed” for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities that are still active should be counted in the total.
    9. Click Update

    4) Add columns and rows to the report.

    At this step, your report will have a single wide section at the top displaying the total number of active vulnerabilities. Before adding another section, we should add a new column to place it in. This will allow us to display several small sections next to each other and make better use of the space on the report.

    To add a column, click the Add Column button.

    Rows can also be added to the report, using the Add Row button.

    Note

    Each Add Column button is associated with a row and will add a column to that row only. Each Add Section button is associated with a column and will add a section to that column only.

    5) Add a “new vulnerabilities in last 30 days” section.

    1. Click the Add Section button and select Single Value from the menu
    2. Enter “Vulnerabilities in last 30 days” for the Title
    3. Select “Vulnerability” for the Data Model
    4. Select “Count” for the Measures. This tells the section to initially display the total number (count) of vulnerabilities in the system.
    5. Click Add
    6. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    7. Select Display
    8. Enter “new” in the After Label field. This will add text after the number of new vulnerabilities.
    9. Click Update
    10. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    11. Select Filters
    12. Click the Add AND Clause button. This will allow us to set two conditions on this section.
    13. Select “Status” for the first attribute, “Not Equals To” for the operator, and “Fixed” for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities that are still active should be counted in the total.
    14. Select “First Found" for the second attribute, “In Last” for the operator, and "30 Days" for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities first found in the last 30 days should be counted in the total.
    15. Click Update

    6) Add a “percent of vulnerabilities that are critical risk” section.

    1. Add a new column to the report next to the existing sections.
    2. Click the Add Section button and select Single Value from the menu
    3. Enter “Critical Risk” for the Title
    4. Select “Vulnerability” for the Data Model
    5. Select “Percentage” for the Measures. This tells the section to display the percent of vulnerabilities in the system with a specified quality.
    6. Select "Risk Rating" for the Dimensions.
    7. Select "Risk Rating" and "Ascending" for the Sort.
    8. Click Add
    9. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    10. Select Display
    11. Enter “%” in the After Label field.
    12. On the Appearance tab, enter "red" as the background section color and "white" as the text section color.
    13. Click Update
    14. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    15. Select Filters
    16. Select “Status” for the first attribute, “Not Equals To” for the operator, and “Fixed” for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities that are still active should be counted in the total.
    17. Click Update

    7) Add an "open vulnerabilties by risk score" section.

    1. Add a new row to the report below the existing sections.
    2. Click the Add Section button and select Column from the menu
    3. Enter “Open Vulnerabilities by Risk Score” for the Title
    4. Select “Vulnerability” for the Data Model
    5. Select “Count” for the Measures. This tells the section to display the total number (count) of vulnerabilities in the system.
    6. Select "Risk Score" for the Dimensions and check the boxes to enable buckets and use custom ranges. This will divide the total number of vulnerabilities according to risk score ranges, like between 4 and 5.
    7. Enter "10" for the number of buckets.
    8. Set the From and To ranges for each row as 0 to 1, 1 to 2, 2 to 3, etc.
    9. Select "Risk Score" and "Ascending" for the Sort.
    10. Click Add
    11. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    12. Select Display
    13. On the General tab, check "Drilldown" and "Show values". "Drilldown" will allow reviewers to click columns to view a list of all vulnerabilities of that risk score. "Show values" will display the total number of vulnerabilities of that risk score above the column.
    14. Click the Appearance tab, and check "Conditional colors" under Options.
    15. Use the + button to add a row until you have ten rows.
    16. Enter the 0..1, 1..2, 2..3, etc. as the values and colors of your choice as the colors. Colors can be hex codes or color words.
    17. Click Update
    18. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    19. Select Filters
    20. Select “Status” for the first attribute, “Not Equals To” for the operator, and “Fixed” for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities that are still active should be counted in the total.
    21. Click Update

    8) Add a "top vulnerabilities" section.

    1. Add a new column to the report next to the existing section.
    2. Click the Add Section button and select Table from the menu.
    3. Enter “Top Vulnerabilities” for the Title
    4. Select “Vulnerability” for the Data Model
    5. Leave the Measures field empty.
    6. For Dimensions, select "Title", "Risk Rating", and "Risk Score".
    7. Select "Risk Scoring" and "Descending" for the Sort.
    8. Click Add
    9. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    10. Select Display
    11. On the Columns tab, set the "Title" width to 75% and rendering to "Drilldown". This will allow users to click on the vulnerabilities on the table to view them.
    12. Disable the "Risk Score" column. Disabling the display of the risk score allows us to sort by it while keeping the table tidier with fewer columns.
    13. Click Update.
    14. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    15. Select Filters
    16. Select “Status” for the first attribute, “Not Equals To” for the operator, and “Fixed” for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities that are still active should be counted in the total.
    17. Click Update

    9) Add a "new vulnerabilities by data center over time" section.

    Note

    In order to sort vulnerabilities by data center, your business structure must already be built into your system. Hosts must be associated to business services and business services to locations (data centers).

    1. Add a new row to the report below the existing sections.
    2. Click the Add Section button and select Line from the menu.
    3. Enter “New Vulnerabilities Over Time” for the Title
    4. Select “Vulnerability” for the Data Model
    5. Select “Count” for the Measures. This tells the section to display the total number (count) of vulnerabilities in the system.
    6. For Dimensions, click the attribute field and scroll to the bottom. Click "Show related attributes". Select Host attributes → Business Service attributes → and then Location.
    7. Add "First Found" as another attribute to the Dimensions field and choose "Week" for the Transformation field. This will show new vulnerability amounts by week.
    8. Select "First Found" and "Ascending" for the Sort.
    9. Click Add
    10. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    11. Select Display
    12. On the General tab, check "Smooth Line". This will smooth the lines on the graph.
    13. On the Axes tab, set the X Axis to "First Found" and Group By to "Location".
    14. Click Update
    15. Click the Actions button associated with the section
    16. Select Filters
    17. Select “Status” for the first attribute, “Not Equals To” for the operator, and “Fixed” for the value. This creates a conditional statement that only vulnerabilities that are still active should be counted in the total.
    18. Click Update

    10) Save the report.

    1. Click Done in the upper right corner of the report

    Warning

    If you navigate away from the report before saving, you will not be prompted to save and will lose unsaved work.